Back
Filter Search

Show available only

Categories
Price

Select all

Clear all

  • $0 - $10

  • $10 - $50

  • $50 - $100

  • $100 - $500

  • $500 & above

Filter Search

Show available only

Categories
Price

Select all

Clear all

  • $0 - $10

  • $10 - $50

  • $50 - $100

  • $100 - $500

  • $500 & above

Product is not availabe in this category, please select other category

ALL ABOUT RED WINE

Vintners produce red wines from dark-skinned grape varieties. The skins get left in the mixture and add flavor, and color, and tannins, which help preserve the wine and give it texture. Tannins dry out your mouth like black teas and can produce smooth and ripe flavors that integrate seamlessly, or they can present green or bitter flavors that soften as the wine ages. Red wines present differently depending on the type of grapes used, the types of wine mixed together, and their age.

winephoto.jpg

History

The earliest evidence of red wine production dates back to the Neolithic period, around 6000 BC, in what is now Georgia. From there, the popularity of red wine spread throughout the Mediterranean and into Europe, where it became a staple of daily life. In ancient Greece and Rome, red wine was used in religious ceremonies and was considered a symbol of wealth and social status. Over time, the production and consumption of red wine has evolved, and today it is enjoyed all over the world. Whether you prefer a bold and spicy Cabernet Sauvignon or a light and fruity Pinot Noir, red wine has a rich and complex history that is as varied and interesting as the many different types of wine available today.

How Red Wine is Made

Depending on the style of wine produced, the crafting process varies. The winemaking process involves a few different steps. First, winemakers grow and harvest grape varieties that produce a particular style of wine. Then, they prepare the grapes for fermentation by either leaving the bunches on their stems or removing them, which affects the sweetness of the wine. At this point, they either crush the grapes to make a must (basically grape juice) or leave them in their skins to burst during fermentation; the skins float to the top of the mixture if left on the fruit. After all the preparation, vintners start alcohol production by adding yeast to the must to start fermentation. Wine naturally ferments with yeasts in the air if left alone, so most winemakers inoculate the must and add the yeast of their choosing. The soon-to-be wine gets left alone to ferment for at least ten days although most get left alone for much longer periods. Finally, winemakers begin to clarify the wine by filtering it. Sometimes they move the batch from one container to another to leave unwanted material behind, and at other times they use an actual filter. Regardless of the method chosen, they continue to clarify the wine by adding things like compounds, egg whites or clay that help remove excess yeasts and solids left behind. They then move it into another vessel before aging and bottling the product.

Types of

  • Cabernet Sauvignon - A dry, full bodied wine with medium to strong tannins, cabernet sauvignon has been around since the 17th century and is often aged in oak barrels. When grown in northern climates, the underlying tastes vary from bell pepper to mint and cedar backed by a grape cherry like taste. In moderate climates, they produce cherry and black olive notes. In hot climates they can get very overripe “jammy” tastes.
  • Merlot - A dark blue, easy drinking, versatile red wine with prominent fruit flavors, merlot typically comes in two styles. The “international style” harvests grapes late in their development for an intense, high alcohol, plum and blackberry taste. The traditional “Bordeaux style” harvests the grapes much earlier, which maintains its acidity and maintains a more red fruit flavoring (cherries and strawberries) with some potential leafy, vegetal notes.
  • Zinfandel - Known for its high alcohol content, jammy, candied fruit flavors, and spicy tobacco finish, zinfandel's sweetness depends on the time and climate where vintners harvest the grapes. In colder climates red berry fruit flavors (like raspberry) come through, and in warmer climates blackberry, pepper, and anise flavors arise.
  • Syrah/Shiraz - Syrah, also known as Shiraz in Australia, is a full bodied wine with bold flavors of blackberry, black pepper, and spice. It is particularly associated with the Rhône region of France, but is also grown in other parts of the world, such as Australia.
  • Sangiovese - Sangiovese is a medium bodied wine that is the primary grape used in Chianti, a wine from the Tuscany region of Italy. It is known for its flavors of red cherry and tomato, and its high acidity.
  • Pinot Noir - Pinot Noir is a light to medium bodied red wine that is known for its delicate flavors and aromas of red fruit, such as raspberry and strawberry. It is a notoriously difficult grape to grow, which makes it a bit more expensive than other red wines.
  • Malbec - Malbec is a full bodied wine that is known for its flavors of blackberry, plum, and leather. It is particularly associated with Argentina, where it has become the country's signature grape.

WHAT DOES RED WINE TASTE LIKE?

Red wine can have a complex and diverse flavor profile, influenced by factors such as the grape variety, region of origin, and winemaking techniques. In general, red wines tend to be richer and more full-bodied than white wines, with a range of flavors that can include fruit, earth, spice, and oak. Common fruit flavors in red wine can include dark berries like blackberry and raspberry, as well as plum and cherry. Earthy notes may include leather, tobacco, or mushroom, while spice aromas can range from cinnamon to black pepper. Some red wines may also have a woody or vanilla-like taste from being aged in oak barrels. The overall taste of red wine can vary from bold and tannic to smooth and fruity, depending on the specific wine, the individual palate of the taster, and also what food the wine is paired with!

kelsey-knight-udj2tD3WKsY-unsplash (1).jpg

How to Drink Red Wine

Bartenders and wine aficionados typically serve red wines in tall, narrow Bordeaux or wide bowl Burgundy glasses at about 60°F. Use the narrow option when drinking full-bodied, highly alcoholic, spicy wines to let the wine breathe and present their actual aromas instead of just ethanol. Choose a wide bowl glass for wines that present more subtle aromas to help trap and concentrate their smells. Whichever glass you use, make sure to grab them from their stems to help prevent the wine from heating up due to your hands’ natural heat. Since wine varies so much within each category, learning to appreciate individual aromas and flavors requires keen senses. For those that like to judge and classify their wines, LiquorSplit offers the following tips: 1. Check the labels to determine the grape varieties used and the locality of the vineyard. 2. Choose the right glass, and let it sit either a decanter or your glass for about twenty minutes before drinking. 3. Hold the glass by the stem to avoid heating it up, and observe the textures formed from the droplets along the edges. 4. As your drink, take a small sip at first and swirl it through your mouth. Don’t finish it immediately! Let it sit for a while to fully express itself. 5. If you plan on testing more than one wine at a time, give yourself time between glasses, or spit it out after tasting to avoid getting too drunk to notice the subtle differences.

Types of Grapes Used in Red Wines

Red wine is a timeless classic that never goes out of style. Whether you're enjoying a cozy night in or celebrating a special occasion, a good bottle of red wine can make all the difference. At LiquorSplit, we enjoy a wide variety of red wines made from all different kinds of grapes. Check out the list of flavor profiles associated with different grape varietals below to see what would be a good fit for your palate!
  • Cabernet Franc grapes - bell pepper, dried herbs, mint, roasted red pepper
  • Cabernet Sauvignon grapes - black currant, black cherry, blackberry
  • Gamay grapes - red currant, raspberry, cranberry, cherry
  • Grenache/Garnacha grapes - strawberry, raspberry, white pepper undertones, ages into leathery and tar
  • Malbec grapes - These grapes’ flavors vary depending on their environment and can produce chocolate, smokey, floral, blueberry, blackberry, raspberry, cherry, plum, black pepper, liquorice, vanilla, mint, and even tobacco flavors
  • Merlot grapes - plum, blueberry, strawberry, cranberry, herbs, clove, vanilla, black cherry, tobacco, liquorice, cola
  • Mourvèdre/Mataro grapes - blackberry, plum, black cherry, black currant, olive, licorice, pepper, earthy, woody, sulfur, meat
  • Nebbiolo grapes - bitter almond, herbs, leather, strawberry, prune, raisin, truffles, leather, balsamic, tar, rose, cranberry, cherry, raspberry, licorice
  • Pinot Noir grapes - spice, cherry, strawberry, tea leaves, herbs, cola, mushrooms, licorice, flowers
  • Sangiovese grapes - red plum, fig, strawberry, tart cherry, tomato, tobacco, rose
  • Syrah/Shiraz grapes - black/white pepper, blueberry, blackberry, rotundone (found in rosemary, black pepper, and thyme)
  • Zinfandel grapes - raspberry, blackberry, pepper, anise, plum, spice

LIQUORSPLIT’S FAVORITE RED WINES

unnamed.png
image-asset.jpeg
19 crimes.jpg
picture-4.jpg
Select your Delivery Location

Please select your delivery location for us to get the order deliver faster.

Use my location

OR

Select your City
Please select the city where you want the order to be delivered

Cities we are currently delivering

Home

0

Cart

Profile